New York: ‘captain Phillips’ Kicks Off Fest With Standing Ovation

Captain Phillips

But there are larger reasons why robust growth eludes New York in particular, its well-earned reputation as being hostile both to business and economic success. New Yorks comparatively high taxes (on corporate and personal incomes, on estates and property) coupled with the most aggressive regulatory climate in the nation, surely signal that growth should be happening elsewhere. Then, too, every New York employer knows another reason why no one would relocate a plant here the scaffold law is code for an unbridled tort bar. (One of Texas Gov. Rick Perrys key arguments in recruiting business from New York and other states is that Texas has reined in class-action suits.) To have any hope of moving forward on a competitive basis with other states, New York must reduce its tax burden by lowering taxes and eliminating its estate tax. To do this, it has to get control of its civil service. Pay and extraordinary benefits where a jail guard in Syracuse can retire on $160,000 have to be recalibrated to fit a state that no longer needs nor can afford an oversized and self-protecting bureaucracy. Most of all, it must focus on big problems with a view that only by making objective gains on several fronts will New Yorks economy really come back. The states politicians initiate programs apparently without wondering if they can genuinely help the economy. Declaring a few acres around state campuses to be tax-free zones begs further cynicism, since everyone knows that even if these do lure a few tax-protected firms, their effect would be too small to make any difference in the overall situation. No, New York has to get serious.

New York Film Fest: ‘Captain Phillips’ Writer, Producer Talk About Gripping True Story, Movie’s Gotham Debut

our editor recommends New York Film Festival 2013: 13 Movies to Know The intense film, which stars Tom Hanks as the titular captain of a U.S. container ship that was hijacked off the Somali coast in 2009, was introduced with great fanfare — highlighted by the attendance of not only Greengrass, Hanks and the film’s principal Somali actors, but also Capt. Richard Phillips himself (before whom Hanks knelt to kiss his hand), a number of the men who worked alongside him on the MV Maersk Alabama and several uniformed U.S. Navy personnel who came to his rescue aboard the USS Bainbridge. FILM REVIEW: Captain Phillips At its conclusion, the film received a prolonged ovation — which turned into a standing ovation once a spotlight was placed on Greengrass and the Somali actors in a box above the rest of the audience (Hanks had to leave early) — from a crowd that included Sony Classics co-chiefs Michael Barker and Tom Bernard; the Oscar-winning screenwriter of Argo Chris Terrio, who’s writing a script for Greengrass now; and the Oscar-nominated actress Marianne Jean-Baptiste, who starred in Greengrass’ 1999 TV film The Murder of Stephen Lawrence; and writer-director James Toback. The general sentiment among New Yorkers at the screening and the Harvard Club after-party — at which Greengrass and particularly the Somali actors were the center of attention — was that the film has a strong shot at scoring a best picture Oscar nomination and an even stronger shot at bringing Hanks his first acting Oscar nom in 13 years, particular for his work during the final minutes of the film, which left much of the audience in tears. Rose Kuo, the executive director of the Film Society of Lincoln Center, noted during her pre-screening remarks that the fest seems to have a thing for movies about men experiencing problems aboard boats: last year’s edition opened with the world premiere of Life of Pi and this year’s, in addition to opening with Captain Phillips, will include a screening of All Is Lost, another example of the sub-genre. This was also the second New York Film Festival opening night screening in the last four years to come courtesy of Sony Pictures and producers Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti and Michael DeLuca, whose last collaboration was the 2010 film The Social Network, which went on to be nominated for eight Oscars and won three. Other recent openers have included About Schmidt (2002), Mystic River (2003), Good Night, and Good Luck (2005) and The Queen (2006), which all went on to receive major Academy recognition, as well. This is the first New York Film Festival in 26 years that was not coordinated by Richard Pena. He was succeeded at the end of last year’s fest by Kent Jones.

The New York Film Festival kicked off Friday night with a standing ovation for the premiere of Sony’s Captain Phillips , the audience clearly impressed by the suspenseful Tom Hanks-starrer, based on the true story of Captain Richard Phillips’ struggle with Somali pirates in 2009. our editor recommends New York Film Fest: New Chief Explains 2013 Picks (Q&A) Before the movie, screenwriter Billy Ray told The Hollywood Reporter that the gripping nature of the real events made it easy for him to turn them into a film. “As true stories go, this one laid out like a movie,” he said. “I mean, it had drama and tension and huge politics to it. It had action built into it. The beauty was I didn’t have to invent anything, we just had to make smart event choices and get out of its way.” PHOTOS: New York Film Festival’s Movies to Know Ray conceded that there were challenges in terms of trying to portray the events accurately, but he had help from the real Captain Phillips to make sure he got the details right. “I had access to him whenever I needed it,” Ray said. “I spent a great deal of time with him and his family. A lot of phone calls, a lot of e-mails back and forth when he was back at sea againHe was absolutely invaluable.” Ray’s previous work includes writing screenplays for Shattered Glass and the movie version of State of Play, and he told THR that those titles, as well as Captain Phillips, are all films about integrity. Captain Phillips notably bypassed the Venice, Telluride and Toronto Film Festivals to debut in New York, a decision that producer Michael De Luca told THR was based on a combination of timing and his and producer Scott Rudin’s Gotham-centric backgrounds. PHOTOS: Exclusive Portraits of Captain Phillips’ Tom Hanks and Barkhad Abdi “It’s always a combination of schedule and the best platform for the movie and we just thought the New York Film Festival would be the best opening platform for the film and it worked out for us schedule-wise,” De Luca said. “They really embraced the movie, and any chance to be at the New York Film Festival (I’m a New Yorker, ex-New Yorker because I live in L.A. now, Scott Rudin’s a New Yorker), any chance to be in this festival because of its prestige and what a great show they put on, we had to leap at it.” Prior to its enthusiastic reception at the festival, Captain Phillips had already received good reviews from critics like THR’s own Todd McCarthy .

India, Pakistan holding peace summit in New York

(Photo: Andrew Burton, AP) SHARE 11 CONNECT 76 TWEET 2 COMMENTEMAILMORE UNITED NATIONS (AP) A meeting of the Pakistani and Indian prime ministers in New York this weekend is a fresh chance for one leader to push for peace on the subcontinent and likely the last chance for the other. Three-time Pakistani premier Nawaz Sharif and India’s Manmohan Singh are due to meet Sunday on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly. It is their first face-to-face since Sharif’s election victory in May. Singh will step down next year. Sharif calls the meeting a chance for a “new beginning,” and Singh on Saturday told the General Assembly that “I reciprocate his sentiments.” But Singh has tamped down expectations for the talks, which take place amid an upsurge in militant attacks in disputed Kashmir. Speaking Friday after a White House meeting with President Barack Obama, Singh said, “the epicenter of terror still remains focused in Pakistan.” In Saturday’s speech, Singh said India is committed to resolving all issues with Pakistan, but he again expressed his concerns about terror attacks and repeated his government’s view that Kashmir “is an integral part of India.” The need for peace between the South Asian nuclear rivals has rarely been greater. They have been at odds since Britain granted independence and carved up the subcontinent in 1947, but the impending U.S. military withdrawal from Afghanistan, where India and Pakistan have competing interests, adds new uncertainty to a region increasingly threatened by Islamic militancy. “It’s timely for them to meet,” said Karl Inderfurth, a former top U.S. diplomat for South Asia and now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank in Washington. “It’s Nawaz Sharif’s first chance as the new prime minister to reach across to his Indian counterpart and it’s maybe Manmohan Singh’s last chance to do what he has repeatedly said he wants to do, which is open up a new relationship with Pakistan.” Both men are familiar with the pitfalls of seeking to improve ties between India and Pakistan a relationship scarred by three wars and deep mutual suspicion. Sharif was in power when Pakistan first tested a nuclear bomb in 1998. But he also presided over one of the more upbeat episodes in recent relations with India.